Health & Social Care News & Updates | The Mandatory Training Group

Health & social care news and updates | Health & social care statutory and mandatory training updates | The Mandatory Training Group
Welcome to The Mandatory Training Group's healthcare and social care news page. Look out for the latest topical news and updates relating to the health and social care sectors, research and development, health informatics, health & social care technology management, policy, regulatory and compliance issues.

health social care news updates the mandatory training group

​​​​​​​Why follow our health & social care news & updates?

Our blog/news page gives a fascinating insight into topical news and other relevant topics in health and social care. Our team have extensive experience in health and social care and will share their informed opinions based on their occupational practice and evidence base. We are also keen to know about your own experiences, either through comments on our blogs and news articles or joining our fast developing team of contributors.

Key statutory and mandatory training topics

Our news updates will cover the following topics – challenges facing the health and social care sectors; legislative and regulatory requirements for healthcare and social care organisations; statutory and mandatory training requirements; professional issues for healthcare and social care professionals; social commentary relating to health and social care services; current research & development and evidence based practice; health and social care technological advancements; learning management systems (LMS); online health and social care training solutions; healthcare training services; continuing professional development (CPD); continuing nursing education (CNE); continuing medical education (CME); blended learning systems; health and social care workforce development solutions among many others.

Who is this blog written for?

We have developed this blog for everyone who has an interest in health and social care services in the UK, including patients, health and social care professionals, health and social care providers, health and social care commissioners among others.

If you are interested in contributing to our health and social care blog, or have news updates you would like us to publish, please contact our Support Team on 024 7610 0090 or via Email.

Health & social care news and updates | Health & social care statutory and mandatory training updates | The Mandatory Training Group - UK Provider

13/09/17
How do I become a health and social care trainer? What are the qualifications and skills required to become a health & social care trainer?

Health trainers offer practical support to their clients to change their behaviour and achieve their own health goals.

How do I become a health and social care trainer

What does health and social care training involve?

Health trainers help their clients to assess their lifestyles and wellbeing, set goals for improving their health, agree action-plans, and provide practical support and information that will help people to change their behaviour. This could include promoting the benefits of:
taking regular exercise and eating healthily
reducing alcohol intake
breastfeeding
practising safe sex
stopping smoking

Working as a health trainer, you could be:
helping people identify how their behaviours may be affecting their health
supporting individuals to create a health plan to help make changes to improve their health
helping individuals to become more knowledgeable about things that can affect their health and wellbeing
signposting to other agencies and professionals

As a health trainer, you’ll be knowledgeable about the health issues that affect the community you are working in.

​​​​​​​Who will you work with?

As a health trainer, you’ll be knowledgeable about the health issues that affect the community you are working in. The clients that you work with may be identified from existing community and support groups, through referral (such as from a health professional at a children’s centre) or via self-referral. Your clients will often come from hard-to-reach, disadvantaged groups such as the homeless, travellers and those with drug, alcohol and addiction problems.
While much of your work might be on a one-to-one basis, sometimes you could be working with groups of people, for example delivering group sessions on behaviour change and health improvement.
Health trainers may also be assisted in their work by members of the community who have been trained to be health trainer champions (HTCs are usually volunteers who have undertaken health improvement training at level 2 with the Royal Society of Public Health, and who can help health trainer services to extend their reach within communities).

​​​​​​​Where will you work?

Health trainers often work for private companies that provide a health trainer service for the NHS or for a local authority. They may also work directly for the NHS, a local authority or a charity, in the prison service or the armed services.

​​​​​​​Entry requirements (health trainer)

Find out more about what you need to work as a health trainer.
The nationally recognised training for health trainers is the City and Guilds level 3 Certificate for Health Trainers. You can take this course without any previous qualifications. As a trainee health trainer, you will study for this nationally recognised Certificate. Once you have completed this qualification, you will be able to work as a health trainer. In some instances, the cost of training may be funded by the individual employer.

​​​​​​​You can take this course without any previous qualifications.

Each post will have slightly different entry requirements so it’s important to check the person specification for the role. Typically applicants will bring previous relevant experience of working in a paid or voluntary capacity with residents or community groups or both.
It can be an advantage to have experience or qualifications (or both) in areas such as nutrition, weight management, understanding and encouraging healthy lifestyles, instructing on exercise or using a gym.
Some posts may require the ability to speak in specific languages

Skills and interests (health trainer)

Find out more about the particular skills and interests needed by health trainers.
As a health trainer, you’ll have knowledge of, and an interest in things that help people to stay healthy and you’ll enjoy working closely with people.

​​​​​​​As a health trainer, you'll be able to work both independently and as part of a team.

​​​​​​​Examples of some of the particular skills and qualities you’ll need as a health trainer include:
good verbal and written communication skills
active listening skills
empathy, respect, tact, and a non-judgemental, persuasive, reassuring approach
positivity and a supportive and motivating approach
respect for client confidentiality
knowledge of your own limitations, when to ask for support, and when to refer a client to other specialist services or professionals
good time-management and planning skills
ability to work both independently and as part of a team
IT and keyboard skills
Health Trainers have skills and knowledge primarily at level 4 of the Skills for Health Career Framework.

​​​​​​​You might also find it helpful to take a look at our career planning section to think more about what skills and qualities you have to offer.

​​​​​​​Training and development (health trainer)

​​​​​​​Once you’re working as a health trainer, it’s likely you’ll be offered ongoing training and development as part of your role. This could be in topics such as mental health, weight management or stopping smoking, to name but a few of the varied areas in which health trainers may develop additional knowledge and skills.
Some health trainers may already be working as pharmacy assistants, leisure centre workers, or in community outreach roles and choose to take a health trainer qualification to enhance their skills and further development.

​​​​​​​How do I become a health and social care trainer? Trainer qualifications and skills for health and social care providers - The Mandatory Training Group

11/09/17
Experts say there is little evidence of harm in light drinking while pregnant - new study finds little evidence to suggest that drinking causes any harm

For many years, healthcare guidance has advised women to abstain from drinking alcohol during pregnancy, arguing that this would result in potential harm to the baby. However, a new study has shown that there is little evidence to show that an odd glass of wine could harm the unborn baby.

Mandatory training for midwives & NHS staff -

NHS England guidance for women

Experts say mothers who are consumed by anxiety and guilt for having drunk the odd glass of wine when they are pregnant should be reassured by a new study showing there is very little evidence that it harms the baby. Over the years, there has been a lot of contradicting advice about the safety of drininking while pregnant, causing much anxiety to expectant mothers. New guidance by NHS in England in 2016 urged women to try not to drink at all, but in the real world, the new study has found that up to 80% in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia drink some alcohol while they are pregnant. They noted that since half of all pregnancies are unplanned, many women drink before they know that they are actually pregnant.

How has the new study been received by experts?

Although there is strong evidence that excessive drinking harms babies in the womb, the study by researchers at the University of Bristol found that few good studies had been done on light drinking, which they defined as no more than two small drinks, or four units per week.
“Despite the distinction between light drinking and abstinence being the point of most tension and confusion for health professionals and pregnant women and contributing to inconsistent guidance and advice now and in the past, our extensive review shows that this specific question is not being researched thoroughly enough, if at all"
BMJ Open journal

The researchers argue that it is impossible to say whether drinking small amounts of alcohol is safe or not without looking at the evidence, saying:
“Formulating guidance on the basis of the current evidence is challenging,” they say. They agree that drinking no alcohol in pregnancy is the safest option, but women should be told that little research has been done on light drinking, although they should also be informed that “absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"
BMJ Open journal

Some experts argue that women who over the years have been alarmed by NHS England guidance to abstain from even small amounts of alcohol may be relived. David Spiegelhalter, who is the Winton professor for the public understanding of risk at the University of Cambridge said:
“This valuable and humane study has shown that warnings about the dangers of drinking any alcohol at all during pregnancy are not justified by evidence... A precautionary approach is still reasonable, but with luck this should dispel any guilt and anxiety felt by women who have an occasional glass of wine while they are pregnant.”
Professor David Spiegelhalter

Another expert, Dr Christoph Lees, who is a clinical reader in obstetrics at Imperial College London, noted that the new study exposes the weaknesses of the evidence that has been used to develop official NHS England guidance, saying:
“Whilst it is possible that light drinking is associated with a slightly higher risk of having a small baby, there are other possible explanations. It will be an important challenge for those responsible for public health messages to convey nuanced advice that explains how robust or otherwise the evidence is"
Dr Christoph Lees

However, Professor Russell Viner from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health took a more cautious approach regarding the findings of the new study, saying:
“This research confirms that based on current evidence it is impossible to say what constitutes a ‘safe’ amount of alcohol a woman can drink if she’s trying for a baby and for women who are pregnant... My advice to women is that it’s best not to drink at all if you’re trying for a baby or pregnant. Regularly drinking even small amounts could be harmful and should be avoided, in line with the precautionary approach"
Professor Russell Viner

Justine Roberts, who is the founder and CEO of Mumsnet, welcomed the study, saying:
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“Unlike the no-smoking message, which seems to be universally believed if not always adhered to, pregnant women have remained a little sceptical about the zero-alcohol advice, and judging from the Mumsnet forums tend to be pretty realistic about the probable impacts of the odd drink and see no point in dwelling on the amounts they drank before even knowing they were pregnant"
Justine Roberts


Since the 1950s, the advise for women has been contradictory. Over the past two decades, the focus has been primarily on abstinence and total ban on alcohol while pregnant., rather than the facts relating to the potential or actual dangers of drinking while pregnant.

About the Mandatory Training Group

The Mandatory Training Group is the leading provider of statutory and mandatory training for health and social care providers in the UK, including midwives, doctors, nurses, allied health professions and health and social care support workers. Our wide range of courses and training programs include:

Contact our Support Team on 02476100090 or via Email, stating your statutory and mandatory training requirements.
Experts say there is little evidence of harm in light drinking while pregnant - Accredited Train the Trainer Providers - The Mandatory Training Group
18/03/17
Does the 'all in one day mandatory training’ format work? What are the alternatives to the 'all in one day mandatory training' format?
‘Do you provide the all in one day mandatory training?’ – ‘Can you provide all in one day mandatory training for 24 of my staff this week please?’. I get these sort of calls and various emails requests every single day. All in one day mandatory training is quite common amongst locum medical, nursing and care recruitment agencies, some care homes and even NHS and private hospitals. So what is this ‘1 day mandatory training’?

Does the 'all in one mandatory training' format work- The Mandatory Training Group -

What is the all in one day mandatory training?

In simple terms, the one day mandatory training is the EasyJet or Ryanair version of statutory and mandatory training. By this, I mean no frills, cheap, quick, apparently no hassle unless you read the small print. So what exactly do I mean?
There are a number of ‘one day mandatory training’. There are many venues to book across the UK, very cheaply at an average of £60 per learner per day plus VAT. So far so good. You simply select the venue you want to attend your training, select the date, pay securely and complete your booking. You are reminded that places fill up very fast so you have to book very fast. You are also reminded to make sure that you have selected the ‘best mandatory training course for you’.

What types of mandatory training courses are available?

The most readily available type of mandatory training is the ‘all in one day mandatory training’. However, over the past few years, many NHS Trusts and NHS healthcare recruitment frameworks (NHS procurement consortiums) are now insisting that nursing agencies and locum medical agencies should complete mandatory training that is aligned to the Skills for Health UK Core Skills Training Framework (UKCSTF). Some of the providers of all in one mandatory training courses are now also providing ‘mandatory and statutory training’ that is ‘Skills for Health Aligned’. Again the responsibility falls on the learner to select the mandatory + statutory training course that is suitable for you. In most cases, you nursing agency or locum medical agency state to you which mandatory training course you should complete.

So who should complete all in one day mandatory training?

Most providers state that all in one day mandatory should be completed by all nurses and healthcare staff, including those who work full time or part time in the NHS and also agency nurses and agency workers.

So why do healthcare and nursing staff need mandatory training?

Most training providers define mandatory training as a compulsory requirement that places responsibility on healthcare and nursing staff to work in a safe manner. The premise is that the core training modules in the mandatory training courses are delivered at the appropriate depth and level of understanding for each group of health professionals. All in one day mandatory training courses are often advertised as being based on the tried and tested classroom training, including practical demonstrations and user involvement and learner assessments. As such, this ensures compliance with regulatory requirements (mandatory training requirements) for nurses and healthcare staff.

What are the objectives of the one day mandatory training format?

Training providers are that all in one mandatory training enables healthcare and nursing staff to meet their mandatory training requirements regardless of whether it is annual updates or refresher mandatory training.

What is covered in the all in 1 day mandatory training course?

Training providers argue that their all in one day statutory and mandatory training formats were developed for NHS Trusts, nursing agencies and locum agencies to meet regulatory requirements. On paper, this looks fine, but typically the all in one day mandatory training format covers the following training modules:
  1. Health and Safety at Work
  2. Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)
  3. Reporting Injuries and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR)
  4. Infection Prevention and Control
  5. Food Hygiene/Food Safety
  6. Fire Safety Awareness
  7. Manual Handling - (Including practical sessions and assessments)
  8. Equality and Diversity
  9. Information Governance/Caldicott Principles
  10. Basic Life Support (including practical sessions and assessments for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
  11. Safeguarding Vulnerable Adults (Levels 1 & 2)
  12. Safeguarding Children (Levels 1 & 2)
  13. Conflict Management (Conflict Resolution)
  14. Complaints Handling
  15. Lone Working

What are the benefits of one day mandatory training?

Training providers report various benefits of the ‘all in one day’ mandatory training format. Purported one day mandatory training benefits include:
  • Full day ‘expert classroom mandatory training’
  • All mandatory training modules completed in one day!
  • A mandatory training certificate valid for one year issued on the same day
  • All training provided by fully qualified mandatory training trainers
  • Mandatory training delivered at a competitive £60 per delegate
Apart from individual bookings on open courses, the ‘all in one day’ statutory + mandatory training course is also offered to nursing and healthcare providers at their own venues for very ‘competitive prices’.

One day mandatory training for NMC revalidation

Since the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) introduced revalidation for nurses in April 2016, many training providers have started offering their all in one day mandatory training courses as being suitable for providing evidence of continuing professional development (CPD) for nurses’ revalidation. Technically, a mandatory training certificate can be used as evidence of CPD hours for NMC revalidation.

What do nursing recruitment agencies say about mandatory training?

Our experiences with nursing and care recruitment agencies vary depending on their requirements. Despite the recent push for Skills for Health aligned mandatory training, many companies still request for all in one day mandatory training. It would appear that a sizeable number of companies want the following (from the all in one day mandatory training):
  • The quickest mandatory training format so that they can get their started cleared and ready for work
  • Emphasis on reinforcing the key points of the mandatory training modules
  • High paced delivery summarising the key learning outcomes
  • A low cost and high volume mandatory and statutory training model
  • A consistent mandatory training provider with UK-wide open venues
  • Quick compliance with NHS agency procurement frameworks

Why is mandatory training required?

To understand the crux of the matter here, it is important to understand why mandatory training is required for nursing and other healthcare staff. On taking up employment in the NHS and other healthcare settings, nursing, medical and allied healthcare professionals are required to complete statutory training as part of their induction. This includes health and safety, risk assessment, accident reporting and fire safety awareness amongst others. As part of their induction, medical nursing and other health staff are also required to complete mandatory training modules in line with their professional roles and organisational positions. Temporary staff, including bank workers, locum doctors, allied health professionals (AHPs), agency workers and agency nurses are also required to complete statutory and mandatory training.

Mandatory training is a compulsory required for nursing, medical and other healthcare professionals as part of their post registration requirements. Although there are some generic mandatory training modules, for example health and safety, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, fire safety, moving and handling people and manual handling of loads, the levels at which the mandatory training courses are delivered differ for each professional group. For example, nursing and care staff may complete the core mandatory training modules at different levels to ensure that they are suitable for their job responsibilities.
A key focus of statutory and mandatory training is the improvement of safety awareness for nursing, medical and health care staff in general. This is part of the legal requirement for health care and social care organisations to provide safe and effective services. Over the past decade, there have been major failings by healthcare providers that have resulted in loss of public confidence. Apart from the expected legal compliance, there is need to improve public confidence in healthcare services.

How is mandatory training regulated?

There is currently no clear regulation of mandatory training in the UK. So far, the most comprehensive guidance has been provided by Skills for Health through their UK Core Skills Training Framework. Other regulatory organisations, for example the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) also provide guidance on the provision of relevant statutory and mandatory training courses within their remit.

Who is qualified to provide mandatory training?

In their UK Core Skills Training Framework (CSTF), Skills for Health have outlined the qualifications and experience that mandatory trainers should have. However, as the CSTF has not been fully enforced, there are still substantial variations in the qualifications and experience of mandatory trainers. Resuscitation Council (UK) also have strict guidance on who can deliver mandatory training courses within their remit.
It is essential that those who provide statutory and mandatory training have the necessary qualifications and experience. It is also important that they stay up to date with current legislation and regulations, and be able to impart this knowledge to healthcare professionals. There are some techniques that are now considered controversial and outdated. Research has found that these methods result in harm to staff and patients alike and should be avoided at all costs. There is also a lot of new technology and other innovations in health services. Up to date statutory and mandatory training courses help to update allied health professionals, nursing and medical staff with new and safe ways of working.

Conclusion

There is need for the provision of good quality statutory and mandatory training that is fit for purpose. Mandatory and statutory training also has to be consistent with the latest legislation and regulatory requirements if it is to be of any value to allied health professionals, nursing and care staff. We argue that the ‘all in one day mandatory training’ format on its own does not adequately cover the learning outcomes as outlined by Skills for Health in their UK Core Skills Training Framework (CSTF) and other regulatory requirements. We fully understand the financial challenges that are being faced by healthcare providers and recruitment agencies. We also fully understand that there is a huge shortage of allied health professionals, medical and nursing staff and it is sometimes quite difficult to release existing staff from duty to attend mandatory training sessions. However, the potential and actual costs of relying on sub-standard mandatory training are huge and unjustifiable.
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This is why The Mandatory Training Group provides a blended learning model of statutory and mandatory training. Unlike the ‘all in one day mandatory training’ format, The Mandatory Training Group’s blended statutory and mandatory training model focuses on comprehensive classroom delivery for practical subjects, supported by interactive eLearning modules in line with the Skills for Health’s UK Core Skills Training Framework. Contact our Support Team today to see how we can help your organisation with guideline compliant mandatory and statutory training.

To find out more about The Mandatory Training Group and how we can help your organisation, please contact our Support Team on 02476100090 or via Email.
Does the 'all in one mandatory training' format work? - What are the alternatives to the 'all in one day mandatory training' format? - The Mandatory Training Group
06/01/17
Mandatory Training Courses for NHS Nurses and Social Care Staff - Skills for health Aligned Statutory & Mandatory Training - Skills for Care Aligned Care Training

The Skills Platform lists a wide range of mandatory training courses which are suitable for NHS workers such as nurses, doctors and dentists. These training courses are also beneficial to care staff working in the social care setting such as a CQC registered care home or domiciliary care agency.

We often get asked “What is the difference between mandatory and statutory training?” - Mandatory training differs from statutory training as they are usually made compulsory by the organisation to ensure their employees are competent to reduce risks, follow guidelines and comply with their policies. Statutory training is required by law or a statutory body such as the Care Quality Commission has instructed the organisation to carry the training to meet legislative requirements. Read our in-depth article for more details.

Organisations such as the General Medical Council (GMC) and the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) are the regulators in the healthcare sector for doctors and nurses. The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) has provided guidance on the differences between mandatory and statutory training. Mandatory training requirements may vary depending on the job role and specific responsibilities of the employee.

Organisations such as the General Medical Council (GMC) and the Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) are the regulators in the healthcare sector for doctors and nurses. The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) has provided guidance on the differences between mandatory and statutory training. Mandatory training requirements may vary depending on the job role and specific responsibilities of the employee.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) can take regulatory action if health and social care providers do not meet the Regulation 18requirements. It states that staff must receive support, training and personal development necessary for them to carry out their job role. Employees that have completed mandatory training course previously should undertake annual updates or refresher training to ensure they have the knowledge and understanding of changes in legislation and directives. Annual refresher training intervals will vary depending on the organisational requirements.

Skills for Health have created the Core Skills Training Framework (CSTF) for healthcare employers which provides guidance, mapping tools and learning outcomes to improve quality, reduce costs, track progress, consistency and standardisation of training.

Mandatory training can be delivered to a group in a classroom environment such as a training centre by an experienced trainer which will cover both the theory and practical elements. Alternatively, you can purchase an online eLearning bundle which starts from around £50 per person, this would be suitable for individuals that need to learn the theory elements. You should always assess your employees including their training needs, learning styles and identify skills gaps which will help you choose the most suitable delivery method.

In most cases these courses provide an all in one solution, providing an overview of all the core essentials such as health and safety,, safeguarding training, equality and diversity, moving & handling, fire safety and conflict resolution.

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Mandatory Training Courses for NHS Doctors, Nurses, AHPs and Adult Social Care Staff - The Mandatory Training Group

06/01/17
Basic life support/resuscitation guidelines for UK trainers and assessors - Skills for Health UK CSTF aligned basic life support training guidance for trainers

We receive a lot of calls from many health and social care service providers and training providers regarding the regulation around basic life support/resuscitation, first aid and automated external defibrillators (AEDs). Organisations such as Skills for Health and the Resuscitation Council (UK) have set out the standards for resuscitation training in line with organisational services and individual professional responsibilities.

The Mandatory Training Group provide the following basic life support train the trainer courses and trainer packs:
Basic life support + Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Train the Trainer Courses + Trainer Materials - Classroom & Online CPR Train the Trainer Courses
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Context statement on resuscitation training

It is a common expectation that healthcare staff will have sufficient knowledge and skills to be able to recognise and respond to signs of clinical deterioration. Where healthcare staff can anticipate, identify and respond to patient signs of clinical deterioration they can prevent further decline that might otherwise culminate in cardiorespiratory arrest. Consequently there has been a particular focus in promoting greater awareness and understanding in the needs and care of the deteriorating patient.

While the priority is on preventing clinical deterioration, some patients’ condition will progress to cardiorespiratory arrest and require cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Early and effective resuscitation can save lives. Research in emergency care of collapsed people has led to significant advances in resuscitation techniques. Healthcare organisations must have a clearly defined resuscitation policy and ensure that they provide an effective resuscitation response and service. As part of their duty to ensure safe and effective care, healthcare organisations must ensure that their workforce receives the appropriate training, including periodic updates, in order to maintain a level of resuscitation competence relevant to their role.
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The requirements stated are minimum standards and apply to the majority of the workforce in roles and settings where they might be required to provide initial CPR until the arrival of advanced life support expertise and support.

Current resuscitation policy guidance

Expert organisation
​​​​​​​Relevant expert guidance
England
Scotland

Target audience for resuscitation training

Learning outcomes are divided into three levels based on knowledge, skills and understanding. The appropriate level of training is dependent upon an individual’s role, work context and a local risk assessment.

The levels given here are for the majority of staff who might need to be involved in delivering CPR. However, there are additional specialist levels of outcomes which need to be achieved for those who are expected to lead a resuscitation team, are resuscitation team members or teach resuscitation.. These specialist outcomes are not covered in this framework. For further information about specialist outcomes, please see the Resuscitation Council (2015) Resuscitation Guidelines and the Quality Standards for Clinical Practice and Training.

Where staff are exposed to and involved in the care of patients from a range of age groups, they should receive the relevant type of resuscitation training.

Level 1
  • Any clinical or non-clinical staff, dependent upon local risk assessment or work context.

Level 2
Staff with direct clinical care responsibilities including all qualified healthcare professionals:
  • Staff working with Adult patients should undertake training in adult basic life support.
  • Staff working with Paediatric patients should undertake training in paediatric basic life support.
  • Staff working with Newborn patients should undertake training in newborn basic life support.

Level 3
Staff with direct clinical care responsibilities including all qualified healthcare professionals:
  • Registered healthcare professionals with a responsibility to participate as part of the adult resuscitation team should undertake adult immediate life support training.
  • Registered healthcare professionals with a responsibility to participate as part of the paediatric resuscitation team should undertake paediatric immediate life support training.
  • Registered healthcare professionals with a responsibility to participate as part of the newborn resuscitation team should undertake newborn life support training.
  • Registered healthcare professionals involved in administering rapid tranquillisation in the care of patients with disturbed mental functioning should undertake adult immediate life support training.
  • Registered healthcare professionals involved in administering sedation in the care of dental or podiatric patients should undertake adult immediate life support training and, where appropriate to case load, paediatric immediate life support training.

Key learning outcomes

Level 1
The learner will:
a) be able to recognise cardiorespiratory arrest
b) know how to summon immediate emergency help in accordance with local protocols
c) be able to start CPR using chest compressions.

Level 2 – Adult Basic Life Support (Level 1 outcomes plus the following)
The learner will:
a) understand current legislation and local resuscitation policies and procedures
b) know how to recognise and respond to patients with clinical deterioration, escalating care in accordance with local policy
c) be able to initiate an appropriate emergency response, which may include management of choking, and the use of the recovery position, all in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines
d) be able to initiate and maintain effective chest compressions in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines
e) be able to provide basic airway management i.e. ensure an open airway
f) be able to initiate and maintain effective lung ventilations in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines
g) know how an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) can be operated safely and appropriately
h) understand their individual role and responsibilities in responding to persons in emergency situations
i) understand their individual responsibilities in reporting and recording details of an emergency event accurately
j) understand the importance of undertaking any resuscitation interventions within the limits of their personal capabilities and context of any previous training received
k) know how they should apply the local Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Policy within clinical context.

​​​​​​​Level 2 – Paediatric Basic Life Support (Level 1 outcomes plus the following)
The learner will:
a) understand current legislation and local Resuscitation policies and procedures
b) know how to recognise and respond to patients with clinical deterioration, escalating care in accordance with local policy
c) be able to initiate an appropriate emergency response, which may include management of choking and the use of the recovery position, in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines
d) be able to provide basic airway management i.e. ensure an open airway
e) be able to initiate and maintain effective lung ventilations in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines
f) be able to initiate and maintain effective chest compressions in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines
g) understand their individual role and responsibilities in responding to persons in emergency situations
h) understand their individual responsibilities in reporting and recording details of an emergency event accurately
i) understand the importance of undertaking any resuscitation interventions within the limits of their personal capabilities and context of any previous training received
j) know how they should apply the local Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Policy within clinical context.

Level 2 – Newborn Basic Life Support (Level 1 outcomes plus the following)
The learner will:
a) understand current legislation and local Resuscitation policies and procedures
b) know how to recognise and respond to a newborn child, escalating care in accordance with local policy
c) understand the importance of temperature control in the care of the newborn
d) be able to initiate an appropriate emergency response in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines
e) be able to provide basic airway management i.e. ensure an open airway
f) be able to initiate and maintain effective lung ventilations in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines
g) be able to initiate and maintain effective chest compressions in accordance with current Resuscitation Council (UK) guidelines
h) understand their individual role and responsibilities in responding to persons in emergency situations
i) understand their individual responsibilities in reporting and recording details of an emergency event accurately
j) understand the importance of undertaking any resuscitation interventions within the limits of their personal capabilities and context of any previous training received.

​​​​​​​Level 3 – Adult Immediate Life Support (Levels 1 & 2 outcomes plus the following)
The learner will:
a) be able to recognise the seriously ill adult and initiate appropriate interventions to prevent cardiorespiratory arrest
b) understand and be able to apply the ABCDE approach
c) know how to manage and co-ordinate roles and responsibilities within the team in responding to emergency situations until the arrival of a resuscitation team or more experienced assistance
d) be able to participate as a member of the resuscitation team
e) be able to provide initial post resuscitation care until the arrival of the resuscitation team or more experienced assistance

Level 3 – Paediatric Immediate Life Support (Levels1 & 2 outcomes plus the following)
The learner will:
a) be able to recognise the seriously ill child and initiate appropriate interventions to prevent cardiorespiratory arrest
b) understand and be able to apply the ABCDE approach
c) know how to manage and co-ordinate roles and responsibilities within the team in responding to emergency situations until the arrival of a resuscitation team or more experienced assistance
d) be able to participate as a member of the resuscitation team
e) be able to provide initial post resuscitation care until the arrival of the resuscitation team or more experienced assistance.

Level 3 – Newborn Immediate Life Support (Levels 1 & 2 outcomes plus the following)
The learner will:
a) be able to recognise the seriously ill newborn and initiate appropriate interventions to prevent cardiorespiratory arrest.
b) understand the importance of maintaining newborn temperature control
c) know how to manage and co-ordinate roles and responsibilities within the team in responding to emergency situations until the arrival of a resuscitation team or more experienced assistance
d) be able to participate as a member of the resuscitation team
e) be able to provide initial post resuscitation care until the arrival of the resuscitation team or more experienced assistance.

Proposed frequency of refresher training or assessment

Proposed Refresher Period It is recommended that refresher training should take place at a minimum of:
Level 1 – Initial training (e.g. at induction) followed by local assessment.
Level 2 – Every year.
Level 3 – Every year.

Organisational Implications
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Each healthcare organisation should determine the required refresher training periods, ensuring that any agreed training schedule is incorporated into their local policy.

Organisations should have a programme of resuscitation audit in place. The outcomes and implications of audits should be used to ensure that key policies and practices are being implemented appropriately and that they inform training priorities in order to improve practice.
Refresher training is aimed at ensuring maintenance of knowledge and skills and, dependent upon role, clinical responsibilities and context. Some staff groups may need more frequent refresher training.

Additional training will be indicated for all staff if there is a change in Resuscitation guidelines nationally or where the organisation has amended its policy locally. Local action plans developed with the involvement of the lead advisor should determine the best way of achieving any training requirements necessitated by changes in guidelines.

A variety of training methods and approaches may be used to plan and deliver flexibly any required refresher training. Refresher training does not mean that staff have to undertake classroom-based training only. Any training methods used must be relevant for promoting the maintenance of knowledge and skills and their effectiveness must be monitored.
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Assessment of Competence
  • Where a staff member or learner can demonstrate the required level of current knowledge, understanding and practice through robust pre-assessment, including where relevant practical assessment, this can be used as evidence that knowledge and skills have been maintained, and the staff member may not need to undertake refresher training.
  • Where a staff member or learner does not meet the required level of current knowledge, understanding and practice through pre-assessment they should complete the refresher training and any associated assessments required.
  • Those individuals who maintain their instructor status on a life support course should be deemed to have the required knowledge, understanding and skills and do not need to undertake refresher training in the speciality concerned
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Suggested standards for training delivery

The Resuscitation Council UK has set out recommendations for the planning, organisation and delivery of resuscitation training and these should be used as a key reference point. This includes guidance on suggested training methods:

“For all staff, a variety of methods to acquire, maintain and assess resuscitation skills and knowledge can be used for annual updates (e.g. life support courses, simulation training, in-house training, mock-drills, ‘rolling refreshers’, elearning, video based training/self-instruction). The appropriate methods must be determined locally.” (Resuscitation Council 2014-15, Quality standards for cardiopulmonary resuscitation practice and training)

In ensuring minimum training standards, the employing organisation should be assured that those learning facilitators that are involved in the delivery of Resuscitation education or training have the appropriate qualifications, experience or background to deliver training to a satisfactory standard. This may include the following:
  • A relevant professional and/or healthcare qualification and/or experience, for example, a Resuscitation Officer.
  • Completion of specific training for cardiopulmonary arrests in special circumstances related to the clinical setting in which they deliver training e.g. paediatrics, newborn, pregnancy and trauma
  • Demonstration of up to date competences in Resuscitation relevant to the level of practice and teaching.
  • A thorough knowledge of Resuscitation issues and procedures and an understanding of their application and practice within a healthcare setting.
  • Experience of teaching and learning, including the ability to meet the competences expected for LSILADD04 Plan and prepare specific learning and development opportunities

Learning facilitators must have access to equipment for resuscitation training, including as appropriate adult and paediatric manikins, airway management trainers, ECG monitors, rhythm simulators and defibrillators.
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Indicative mapping to country specific healthcare standards

Care Quality Commission – Fundamental Standards / Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 – (England)
Safe care and treatment (H&SC Act Regulation 12)
Staffing (H&SC Act Regulation 18)

The Quality Standards for Health and Social Care (2006) – (Northern Ireland)
Theme 2: Safe and Effective Care

Clinical Governance & Risk Management (2005) – (Scotland)
Standard 1: Safe and Effective Care and Services

Health and Care Standards – Wales (2015)
Standard 3.1 Safe and Clinically Effective Care
Standard 7.1 Workforce

Indicative mapping to professional regulatory bodies standards for competence

General Dental Council – Standards for the Dental Team (2013)
  • Principle 1: Put patients’ interests first

General Medical Council – Outcomes for graduates (2015)
  • The doctor as a practitioner – Outcomes 16 a-e
  • The doctor as a professional – Outcomes 21 a & c , 22 a, b & c, 23 e
  • Health and Care Professions Council – Generic Standards of Proficiency
  • Be able to practise safely and effectively within their scope of practice
  • Be able to practise within the legal and ethical boundaries of their profession
  • Be able to establish and maintain a safe practice environment
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Nursing and Midwifery Council – Standards for Pre-registration Nursing Education
  • Domain 1: Professional Values – Adult, Childrens, Learning Disabilities & Mental Health Nursing Competencies 6 & 7
  • Domain 2: Communication and Interpersonal Competencies – Adult, Children, Learning Disabilities & Mental Health Competencies 7
  • Domain 3: Nursing Practice and Decision-Making – Adult, Childrens, Learning Disabilities & Mental Health Competencies 1, 6 & 7
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Indicative mapping to other workforce education developments

The use of the guidance in this Subject can be used to inform the delivery of educational and training interventions which might contribute towards the aims of the following developments: ​​​​​​​

Basic life support/resuscitation guidelines for UK trainers and assessors - CPR & AED guidance - The Mandatory Training Group

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